Father, Son, and Holy Spirit

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When we talk about the Trinity, we have a customary order. Father first. Son second. Holy Spirit third.

I’m wondering if there’s a deeper reason for this.

I’ve heard that it might have something to do with the Son proceeding from the Father, while the Holy Spirit proceeds from the Father and the Son. Maybe just me, but that doesn’t seem like a compelling reason. I might use that logic to reverse the order, as I did in the first sentence of this paragraph.

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As we forgive

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We’re asking our Father forgiveness – for our trespasses, our sins. But then we ask this is as we forgive those who trespass against us.

This means a lot of things.

We’re asking forgiveness to the same degree as we forgive others. Maybe we should think that there’s some kind of accounting: if I haven’t forgiven five times today, then maybe I’m not worthy to receive God’s grace the five times I need it.

I have to get to forgiving!

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World without end

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I’ve been confused about this for decades. Why do we declare: as it was in the beginning, is now and ever shall be, world without end?

First, we believe that our world will come to an end. At the Second Coming.

Second, that phrase doesn’t exist in the Latin version. Et in saecula saeculorum means something like for a really really long time. We have a perfectly good phrase for it in English: forever and ever.

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Our journey of Lent

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It’s rather funny how much people like Ash Wednesday. I heard someone joke once that it’s just about Catholics loving “free stuff”, whether it’s palm fronds or ashes.

I think it’s a deeper need we all have to take stock of the spiritual dimension of our lives.

At New Year’s, people tend to focus on physical health. And in my realm, on career and business goals.

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Thee, thou, thine

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Growing up, I learned the version of the Lord’s Prayer that you see to the right. When I joined the Catholic Church in 1985, I first learned the Hail Mary and many other prayers based on the traditional language.

Thy kingdom come, Thy will be done. Blessed art thou among women, and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, Jesus.

I guess I just assumed that this was my “church language”, kind of like dressing up for Mass.

It seemed respectful and appropriate. Formal.

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Our Lord

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In our modern Christian language, we throw around the phrase “Jesus is Lord!” with great abandon. It conveys a sense of hope and acknowledgement that Jesus our Great Holy One, worthy of praise and honor.

Which is totally fine, but it’s not the whole story.

The concept of “Lord” existed even before the time of Jesus. But what did it mean?

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I have found it odd that our Catholic prayers often don’t include the word “please” or something similar.

Pray for us sinners now and at the hour of our death.

Here we are asking God or Jesus or Mary for something huge, and it seem perhaps a bit impolite. Perhaps English is different than Latin and other languages in this sense?

Give us this day our daily bread.

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