Us

Photo by Anna Dziubinska on Unsplash

Our readings today reinforce the message that we’re all in this together.

It’s a particularly counter-cultural thought, because our country does its best to celebrate individual accomplishment, independence, and self-sufficiency. Which is all good, I suppose, but the fact is that God created us as society, not just a billion random beings on a planet.

I was talking with a guy recently who is writing a book about becoming an elder. Continue reading “Us”

Thy will be done

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How do I know when I’m doing God’s will?

It’s not a flippant question. Every time I say the Lord’s Prayer, I’m asking for God’s will to be done.

I could just hang out and try not to get in the way while God does His thing, but I don’t think that’s the way it works. WE need to do His will. Including ME.

Continue reading “Thy will be done”

Our bread

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Today we begin our Holy Triduum, the time when God and humanity intersect in the Glory of Jesus, our Christ.

I’m thinking about how we ask God to give us this day our daily bread. Why bread? I can go days without having bread, if I have other food to replace it with. And I can survive much longer without food than I can water.

Where have I heard about bread before? Hmm… maybe I’ll head off to Mass and think about it.
Continue reading “Our bread”

As we forgive

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We’re asking our Father forgiveness – for our trespasses, our sins. But then we ask this is as we forgive those who trespass against us.

This means a lot of things.

We’re asking forgiveness to the same degree as we forgive others. Maybe we should think that there’s some kind of accounting: if I haven’t forgiven five times today, then maybe I’m not worthy to receive God’s grace the five times I need it.

I have to get to forgiving!

Continue reading “As we forgive”

Thee, thou, thine

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Growing up, I learned the version of the Lord’s Prayer that you see to the right. When I joined the Catholic Church in 1985, I first learned the Hail Mary and many other prayers based on the traditional language.

Thy kingdom come, Thy will be done. Blessed art thou among women, and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, Jesus.

I guess I just assumed that this was my “church language”, kind of like dressing up for Mass.

It seemed respectful and appropriate. Formal.

Continue reading “Thee, thou, thine”